Symbolism of trains in novel anna karenina by leo tolstoy

Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work.

Symbolism of trains in novel anna karenina by leo tolstoy

Symbols are objects, characters, figures, or colors used to represent abstract ideas or concepts. Trains The many references to trains in Anna Karenina all carry a negative meaning. In this phrase, the word denotes a fast rate of increase of something harmful, which is exactly how Tolstoy viewed the expansion of the railroads.

Literal references to trains are no less negative. Anna first makes her ill-fated acquaintance with Vronsky in a train station, and she sees the death of a railway worker after this meeting as a bad omen. The omen is fulfilled when Anna throws herself under the train near the end of the novel, literally making the railway her killer.

Just as trains carry people away to new places, Anna herself is carried away by her train-station passion for Vronsky, which derails her family life, her social life, and ultimately her physical life as well.

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Vronsky meets Anna just before the race, and his conversation with her makes him nervous and unsettled, impairing his performance. The horse race is dangerous as well, as we find out when several officers and horses are injured during the run. Vronsky attempts to ride out both dangers—the horse race and the affair—with his characteristic coolness and poise, and he manages to do so successfully for a time.

The symbol of the racehorse implies much about the power dynamic between Anna and Vronsky. For Vronsky and the other officer riders, the race is a form of entertainment in which they choose to participate. But there is a deeper force leading both Anna and Frou-Frou into the race, and the stakes are much higher for them than for Vronsky—the race is a matter of life and death for both woman and horse.

Levin is something of an outcast throughout the early part of the novel. His views alienate him from noblemen and peasantry alike.

He is frustrated by Russian culture but unable to feel comfortable with European ways.

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He is socially awkward and suffers from an inferiority complex, as we see in his self-doubts in proposing to Kitty. Levin starts thinking about faith when he is forced to go to confession in order to obtain a marriage license. Although he is cynical toward religious dogma, the questions the priest asks him set in motion a chain of thoughts that leads him through a crisis and then to spiritual regeneration.Trains.

The many references to trains in Anna Karenina all carry a negative meaning.

SparkNotes: Anna Karenina: Themes

Tolstoy sometimes has a character use the French word train, as when Anna complains about Vronsky’s workload by saying “Du train que cela va”—at the rate his work is going—she will never see him at all in a few years.

In this phrase, the word denotes a fast rate of increase of something harmful, which is exactly how Tolstoy .

Symbolism of Trains in Anna Karenina Sophie Lis 12th Grade Throughout the course of Leo Tolstoy’s iconic tragedy Anna Karenina, the presence of trains is essential both in terms of symbolic resonance and as a way to communicate social commentary and setting.

Anna destroys a family and dies in misery, whereas Levin creates a family and concludes the novel happily.

Symbolism of trains in novel anna karenina by leo tolstoy

Anna’s life ultimately loses meaning, whereas Levin’s attains it, as the last paragraph of the novel announces. Ultimately, Tolstoy leaves us with the conclusion that .

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English Literature and Grammar: The Symbols in “Anna Karenina”