An evaluation of life through eriksons psychosocial stages

Trust versus Mistrust Is the world safe and predictable or dangerous and chaotic? Erikson believed that the first stage of psychosocial development was centered on answering this important question.

An evaluation of life through eriksons psychosocial stages

Erikson's stages of psychosocial development - Wikipedia

Trust versus Mistrust Is the world safe and predictable or dangerous and chaotic? Erikson believed that the first stage of psychosocial development was centered on answering this important question. An infant enters the world totally helpless and dependent on caregivers to take care of it.

Erikson believed that during these first two critical years of life, it is essential for an infant to learn that caregivers could be trusted to provide for these needs. When a child is cared for and his or her needs are attended to properly, the child develops a sense that the world is trustworthy.

What happens if a child is neglected or his or her needs are not met with any real consistency? In such a scenario, the child may develop a sense of mistrust about the world. The world may feel like an unpredictable place and the people who should love and care for the child may not be dependable.

Some important things to remember about the trust versus mistrust stage: If this stage is completed successfully, the child will emerge with the virtue of hope.

An evaluation of life through eriksons psychosocial stages

Even when challenges emerge, a person with this quality will feel that they can turn to loved ones for support and care. Those who fail to gain this virtue will experience fear. When a crisis occurs, they may feel hopeless, anxious, and insecure. Autonomy versus Shame and Doubt As children enter the toddler years, they become increasingly independent.

Critical Evaluation

They not only begin to walk by themselves, they also start to perform a number of actions independently. Kids often want to make more choices about the things that impact their life such as selecting which foods to eat and which clothes to wear.

These actions not only play an important role in becoming a more independent human being, they also help determine whether children develop a sense of autonomy or feelings of doubt about their own abilities.

Those who successfully navigate this stage of psychosocial development will emerge with the virtue of will, or the sense that they can take meaningful actions that will influence what happens to them.

Kids who develop this autonomy will feel self-confident and comfortable being themselves. Caregivers can help ensure that kids succeed in this stage of encouraging choices, allowing kids to make decisions, and supporting this increased independence. What actions might lead to failure at this stage?

These children might emerge from this stage lacking self-esteem and confidence in their abilities and they may become overly dependent upon others. Some important things to remember about the autonomy versus shame and doubt stage: This stage helps set the course for further development.

Children who succeed in this stage will have a greater sense of their own independence. Those who struggle may feel shame related to their efforts and abilities.

Initiative versus Guilt The third stage of psychosocial development is centered on kids developing a sense of initiative. Peers become more important as this point, as kids begin to interact more with kids in their neighborhood or in their classroom.

Children begin to engage in more pretend play and social play, often making up games and planning activities with others kids.

At this stage, it is important for kids to make judgments and planning their actions. Kids also begin to assert more power and control over the world around them. During this stage, parents and caregivers should encourage children to explore but also to make appropriate decisions.

Some important things to remember about the initiative versus guilt stage:erik erikson's psychosocial crisis life cycle model - the eight stages of human development Erikson's model of psychosocial development is a very significant, highly regarded and meaningful concept.

Life is a serious of lessons and challenges which help us to grow. He not only expanded Freud’s theory to later stages of life, but he also broadened it considerably, by emphasizing cultural differences and by his stressing the development of the ego through identity challenges that were more psychosocial than strictly biological.

Evaluating My Life In Light Of Eriksons Psychosocial Stages I think, over the period involving the first 12 to 18 months of my life, I was able to resolve the first of Eriksons psychosocial stages adequately. My mother, during this time, supplied me with appropriate provisions of food, warm.

There were originally eight universal stages of development in the psychosocial stage theory which span across an individual’s entire life; these eight stages later had a ninth stage added.

Critical Analysis on Psychosocial Theory of Erik Erikson | Sumaira Ayub - arteensevilla.com

Each stage in the psychosocial stage theory is marked with a crisis. erikson's psychosocial development theory erik erikson's psychosocial crisis life cycle model - the eight stages of human development over time, perhaps aided by his own journey through the 'psychosocial crisis' stages model that underpinned his work.

Psychosocial development is a theory proposed by Erikson that outlines eight stages that people go through and the conflicts they face. Home Personality Erikson’s Eight Stages of Psychosocial Development Erikson’s Eight Stages of Psychosocial Development.

As each person progresses through life, from infancy up until death, they.

Erikson's Eight Stages of Psychosocial Development • Explore Psychology