A personal annotation of the tyger a poem by william blake

In the forests of the night What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry The initial verse refers to tyger, imploring about its beauty and creator. As the poem leads on gradually, the poem clearly makes it a point to discuss God as an entity as opposed to the tyger.

A personal annotation of the tyger a poem by william blake

The language of the poem, however, creates a dreamlike symbolic backdrop for this question that is hard to explain definitively.

In other words, you can say that the poem poses a question, but the poem means a lot more.

The Tyger by William Blake: Summary and Critical Analysis

If we look at the poem more closely, perhaps we can see how Essentially, the poet or speaker of the poem is posing a question: If we look at the poem more closely, perhaps we can see how meaning and symbol interact in this poem. The first stanza begins, Tyger Tyger, burning bright, In the forests of the night Here the poet is either addressing the tiger directly or imaginatively calling forth the image of the tiger.

Blake, William; William Blake: biographical background; Stanza three then brings the universal into a personal focus on the child speaker and the lamb. It is only here that the speaker is openly identified as a child. The poem is song-like with four rhyming/near-rhyming couplets with a final repeated refrain. The couplets are trochaic. As the poem leads on gradually, the poem clearly makes it a point to discuss God as an entity as opposed to the tyger. William Blake champions metaphors as the first one is ‘burning bright’, refers to the tyger’s bright yellow fur, as it roams freely in the forest night. Study Guide for Songs of Innocence and of Experience. Songs of Innocence and of Experience study guide contains a biography of William Blake, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

Similarly, the phrase "forests of the night" calls to mind an image of a dark forest illuminated by the terrible light of the tiger. It also suggests perhaps a kind of internal "forest," a place of mental or moral confusion.

Either way, a forest at night is a place where people get lost and are potential prey for wild animals. It is a beautiful yet terrifying image.

The Tyger - Wikipedia

What immortal hand or eye, Could frame thy fearful symmetry? This is the central question of the poem. Simply put, it means, "How could God create such a terrible thing? The "symmetry" of the tiger symmetry usually being associated with beauty is not good but "fearful. Additionally, the way the question is posed suggests a kind of challenge to God: The first two lines of the second stanza read, In what distant deeps or skies.

“The Lamb”

Burnt the fire of thine eyes? Each question is a variation on this theme. These questions express a kind of heretical accusation toward God but also can be understood to pose questions about the nature of artistic inspiration like where do crazy poems like this one come from?

There is a sense in which Blake conflates God and artist—both are creators. What the hand, dare seize the fire? And when thy heart began to beat, What dread hand? In fact, he imagines him as a blacksmith.

A personal annotation of the tyger a poem by william blake

This is made explicit in the next stanza: God-as-blacksmith is a potent and complicated image. On one hand, there is a sense that Blake is admiring the terrible handiwork of God as master craftsman.

This surprising image of a hellish God making terrible creatures is explicitly called out in the next stanza: Did he smile his work to see? Did he who made the Lamb make thee?

In other words, heaven was so shocked by the creation of the tiger that the stars themselves revolted. The speaker wonders if God took a secret delight in creating this monster. That last question "Did he who made the Lamb make thee?

This question rephrases the question from the very beginning of the poem in a more direct and pointed way. How could the same person who made the lamb also make the tiger?

Or, to put it another way, how can the same God who makes goodness and purity possibly also create death, destruction, and sin? The final stanza repeats the first maybe another kind of "fearful symmetry"?

A personal annotation of the tyger a poem by william blake

How "dare" God do it?Important Literary Features in "The Tyger" Existence of God and his creations - The poem is more about the creator of the tiger than it is about the tiger itself.

In contemplating the terrible ferocity and awesome symmetry of the tiger, the speaker is at a loss to explain how the . Paraphrase Tyger Tygerplease assist in paraphrase the rythm of The Tyger by William Blake 1 educator answer I would like a short paraphrase for the poem "The Tyger".

In summary, 'The Lamb' and 'The Tyger' represent the contrary states of the human soul that are the subject of William Blake's Songs of Innocence and of Experience.

Blake, William; William Blake: biographical background; Stanza three then brings the universal into a personal focus on the child speaker and the lamb. It is only here that the speaker is openly identified as a child.

Language and tone

The poem is song-like with four rhyming/near-rhyming couplets with a final repeated refrain. The couplets are trochaic. Nov 12,  · Update: soo if you could just start off with history of william blake and the poem and the structure and pace of the poem, then move on to analyse line by line:D Follow 3 answers 3Status: Resolved.

William Blake was born in London in Blake claimed to have visions where he could see God and angels. Blake was a nonconformist who associated with some of the leading radical thinkers of his day, such as Thomas Paine.

William Blake: The Tyger